FOIE DE BOEUF SUR LE GRIL: Grilled Beef Liver

Foie de boeuf sur le gril

Liver is one of the most nutrient-dense parts of the animal, and I am always collecting good liver recipes and suggestions.  Because it creates enzymes and is tied in with the gall bladder, even with careful handling it retains a slightly bitter flavor from the gall.  This, to date, is my absolutely favorite liver recipe.  It does not even taste like liver – more like steak nuggets.  If you are grilling, and have some liver on hand, I urge you to try this super simple, but SO delicious superfood recipe.

FOIE DE BOEUF SUR LE GRIL (direct translation)

Cut a beef liver in many thin slices, and put them to cook on the grill over a hot fire, two minutes per side.  Remove, salt, pepper, and add a morcel of butter with chopped parsley mixed in, and serve.

Grilled Beef Liver

Grilled Beef Liver (a modern version)

About 1 lb beef liver

1/2 cup butter, softened

Several springs of fresh parsley

Salt and pepper

  1. Chop the parsley and mix it into the butter while the grill is heating.
  2. Slice the liver into very thin slices, and grill 2 minutes per side.
  3. As soon as the liver is off the grill, season it with salt and pepper, and add a pat of parsley butter.  Serve right away!

{My grandmother, Claudia Meraud, was born in Nice, France.   She immigrated to the US after meeting my grandfather while he was stationed there as a US soldier in WW II.  We spent several summers together, just the two of us, living with her sister in Nice.  She passed along to me an old French cookbook titled  title is La Cuisine:  Guide Practique De La Ménagère by R. Blondeau, Chef de Cuisine.  It originally belonged to my great-grandmother, Lucie Thomas, who was a native of St. Marie-aux-Mines in Alsace.

This cookbook was published in the 1930’s, and was written as a practical guide for a household cook before the days of the fridge and the food processor.  The recipes are delicious, practical, and (of course) packed with good traditional nutrition.

I am creating translated versions of these antique recipes, re-written for the modern cook, and tested with home-grown and seasonal food.}

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